teaching

In Praise of the Junior Developer

"She's a project," my boss said to me. "She's green, and even though she's been working here for several months, you should consider her like a brand new college graduate. She'll need a lot of oversight, a lot of hand-holding and you'll still be expected to finish your projects on time." "Excellent," I said. I'm not sure why my boss felt the need to warn me. Melissa is a new, green developer. I know... Read more >

How To Become A Tech Conference Speaker

I attended the AngleBrackets/DevIntersection tech conference in Las Vegas this past October (as I also did in May), and while I was there I tracked down as many speakers as I could grab and asked them three questions about presenting at conferences: Who are you, and what do you do? Why do you personally present at conferences such as this one? How can someone like me, a regular developer, work toward becoming a presenter at conferences? I only informed... Read more >

Inside the Mind of the Tech Conference Speaker

I attended the AngleBrackets/DevIntersection tech conference in Las Vegas this week (as I did earlier this year). It was a fantastic experience as always, and I highly recommend that developers of all skills and ages attend conferences, even if they aren't the big national ones. More than once, I was enthralled by the ease with which the speakers at this conference would stand on stage in front of packed halls and not run screaming from the terrifying unknown masses.... Read more >

We Don't Have Enough Teachers of Technology

Scott Hanselman has an post up called Bad UX and User Self-Blame - "I'm sorry, I'm not a computer person." It's an excellent read, and in it he discusses the phenomenon of users blaming themselves when something goes wrong when using a computer. Specifically he notes that older people and people who are new to technology feel this way often, saying that it's their fault something went wrong. Hanselman wonders if the problem is abstractions (emphasis mine): I... Read more >